Winchester Super-X 12GA 2.75″ 1oz #8 25rds

$8.99

Winchester Super-X, 12 Gauge, 2.75″, #8, 3.25 Dram, 1.125 oz., Shotshell XU128

Description

Winchester Super-X 12GA 2.75″ 1oz #8 25rds

Super-X Heavy Game Loads are designed for those demanding hunters requiring increased patterning density for more difficult wing shooting situations.

CALIBER 12 GA
CAPACITY 25
CONDITION New in Box
MANUFACTURER PART NUMBER XU128
MODEL Super-X
TYPE Shotgun Ammo
UPC 020892013278.

Winchester primers come in WSP, WLP, WSR, and WLR flavors – small pistol, large pistol, small rifle and large rifle. They use the same primer for standard and magnum loads, which in essence means they are all magnum primers, and they act that way on a chronograph, with larger standard deviation in velocity than I get with a standard primer from CCI.

My preference in primers for standard loads is CCI, and generally speaking in a good load I can get standard deviations in velocity in the high single digits or low teens, where the same load may have and SD of 25-30 with a Winchester primer.

I’ve had good luck using CCI primers. From what I understand CCI benchrest primers are usually easier to ignite than their regular, magnum and military style primers. And the military and magnum primers need a harder strike to ignite.

I had my best groups at 100 yards using CCI BR primers in my AR-15 in 5.56. However, I don’t recommend using them in an AR because they would be the ones most likely to slam fire.

Never had a misfire or slam fire with either the CCI #41 or BR in the AR. Remington Small Rifle Bench Primers #7-1/2 Box of 1000

Olin Industries and Mathieson Chemical merged in 1954 to form the Olin Mathieson Chemical Corporation. The new company had 35,000 employees, 46 domestic and 17 foreign plants. The company manufactured phenoxy herbicides and anti-crop agents for Fort Detrick under contract to the U.S. Army Chemical Corps.[15] The company also manufactured electric batteries, marketing them for use in flashlights.[16] John Olin retired in 1963; the following year, the company brought in hardware experienced executives to run Winchester. The new management team introduced cheap, forged-metal parts into the Winchester line, which eventually damaged the quality reputation Winchester had previously enjoyed.[17]